Posted in education, Uncategorized

My response to #gratitudesnaps

We’ve all had those days. You spilled your coffee on the way to school. The printer jammed so you don’t have the copies you need for your first hour class. Little Jimmy decided a fork and an outlet would make a great combination. Maybe your lesson wasn’t as elaborate as you wanted it to be. Maybe the students gave you blank stares when you tried to explain a new concept. Everything in your day just bombed. You start to spin into that negative space where everything seems like it is failing miserably.

I promise there is an upside in this post.

A few weeks ago I read a great idea in a blog post on Twitter, #gratitudesnaps. The hashtag was created by the queen of #booksnaps, @TaraMartinEDU and the culinary, gamified guru, @tishrich. The goal was simple, get out of that funk. There are amazing things happening all around us and sometimes we need to be reminded to look for those positives in our lives. Each day participants posted a picture of something they are grateful for with the hashtag #gratitudesnaps. It’s a great way to reflect on the good things in life when it seems like things are too negative.

You can read the origin story here: http://www.tarammartin.com/gratitudesnaps/

As soon as I heard about it I was hooked. I spent the day looking for things to snap, found one, and posted it to twitter. The next day the same thing happened, I found things I was grateful for and chose one to post a picture of. I was so excited to share what I was grateful for.

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And then I missed a day.

It wasn’t that I wasn’t grateful, I just got caught up in life and missed it. I promised myself I’d do better the next day and I did. I posted a couple more snaps the following days including extra snaps to make up for the one I missed.

And then I missed another day.

I was failing at this assignment that nobody required me to do, and I was beating myself up over it. I felt like I was doing #gratitudesnaps wrong and people would notice. They would go on my timeline and realize that my dates didn’t line up and I didn’t post a picture each day and they would judge me and the world would end. At least that’s what I told myself.

Later that week I was in the car stressing about what pictures I could take to catch up, and I realized something. I missed the whole point of the activity. The activity was meant to reflect on the good things in life. Instead of focusing on the positive, I was focusing on the pictures and how everyone would like them. I was focusing on how they would make everyone else feel instead of focusing on the way they would make ME feel.

It’s easy to get caught up in the minutiae of life and miss the bigger picture. It’s easy to take something fun like this and turn it into a chore. It’s easy to think that there is just one way to do something.

I’m happily days behind on my #gratitudesnaps. I had several days where I posted multiple pictures and days where I snapped a picture and kept it for myself. And days where I chose to enjoy the moment instead of taking a picture. I’m loving the activity. It’s reminding me what my priorities are.

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I saw Tara the other day at a Dave Burgess presentation and she mentioned that she created a padlet with all of her snaps and quickly saw some trends in what she values. That’s what I plan on doing too. I love this reminder of the joys in my life.

Sometimes we have to give ourselves permission to walk our own paths.

Today my #gratitudesnaps is to Tara and Tisha for encouraging people to put a little more positivity into the digital world.

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Posted in education

You’re more than “just” a teacher…

If you know me at all, you would know that I don’t use profanity, ever since I was a little kid and got my mouth washed out with soap. I’m not a saint, I’ve said plenty of things in my head that shouldn’t be repeated, especially when the copier goes down, and I forgot my coffee, and I just finished my 3rd IEP meeting of the day. But I don’t use it in my everyday vocabulary.

However, I always tell my students to use the words that best fit the story you are trying to tell. There is no other way to say this.

I am a bad ass teacher.

A few weeks ago I had the privilege of going to the ISTE conference in San Antonio. While I was there I saw brilliant educators all around me.  On Sunday night of the conference I went to a reunion event of sorts for people who have been on the “20 to Watch: Educational Tech Leaders” list from the National School Board Association (I was on the list in 2016).  Part way through the reception we all went around the room and shared who we were, what year we were on the list, and what we are currently working on. As we went around the room there were CEOs, company founders, college faculty doing amazing work in research fields, superintendents, and a teacher…me.

For a split second I was embarrassed. I thought “Look at all of the amazing things that these people are doing, all the titles they have next to their name, and then look at me. I’m JUST a teacher.” And then I thought to myself that phrase…

I am a badass teacher.

I’m beginning my 10th year of teaching, and I’ve had several people ask me what my next step is, usually implying that I should start looking toward administration. I feel like there is this perception that being a teacher is just a stepping stone toward something else. If administration is your calling, and you feel like you could make great change at the administrator level, I think that’s fantastic. However, I hate this idea in education that the only way to move forward in your career is to leave the classroom. I have witnessed amazing leaders in all areas of education.

One of my colleagues, Ashford Collins, doesn’t just teach his students to stand up for social change, but lives it by organizing a peace walk in the local community. That’s a bad ass teacher.

Amy Hillman, along with the other science teachers in my building invites members from the community in for a giant science night with thousands of people in attendance. Those are bad ass teachers.  

My wife, Jenica Stock, organizes an after school technology club for her students because she knows the amazing benefits this opportunity gives her students. That’s a bad ass teacher.

For the past 5 years I have helped organize book drives to give over 3000 new and used books to families in need in our area. I also coach an after school LEGO robotics team, present at conferences around the country and write for websites like Edutopia. That’s bad ass.

Don’t ever let anyone make you feel like “just a teacher” or in my case I made myself feel like less than everyone else for my choice to be in the classroom.

As you kick off the new school year, embrace your inner bad ass, and share with others why you’re a #badassteacher.